Task 42: Blanketing

Task 42: Blanketing

Blankets are simple. We want to turn them into signals that something good is about to happen.

The subtasks in blanketing include targeting nose, then withers, to the blanket; being petted with the blanket, and emotional conditioning to give a positive spin on wearing the blanket.

Follow Bravo and John’s adventures learning to blanket on our webpage at the Magic Mustang Tamer. Subscribe to the page there to never miss a chapter.

Task 41 Stationing On A Rope

Task 41 Stationing On A Rope

We are about to want to introduce some tack, so let’s first train the horse to stay put while we work around him. The hardest part for the horse is to notice the rope. The hardest part for the human is to put it on a variable schedule of reinforcement to make the behavior durable.

In the blog on the Magic Mustang Tamer we discuss the problem with actually tying a horse as well as how to train this particular behavior. Be sure to check it out for more information.

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Task 40: Yielding Hips in Response to Belly-taps

Task 40: Yielding Hips in Response to Belly-taps

Prepare the horse to understand single sided leg pressure as a cue to move it’s hind legs laterally. This is the matching element to the one-rein stop we will be installing in Task 55.

For more information about this task, check the blog on The Magic Mustang Tamer. More video and discussion of the principles used to train.

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Task 39: Neck-Rein to Move Front Legs

Task 39: Neck-Rein to Move Front Legs

Install this power steering unit from the start. The front legs move laterally in response to a neck rein cue. This is how we turn the horse while walking forward.

For details of this training task and many more, go to www.MagicMustangTamer.com where we show you effective training techniques most people can succeed with.

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Task 38: Respond to Direct Rein Pressure with Neck Bend

Task 38: Respond to Direct Rein Pressure with Neck Bend

We are going to teach the horse to discriminate between types of rein pressure. We want lateral direct pressure to mean only bend your neck. This sets the horse up for riding with accuracy. Bending the neck without moving the feet will help solidify a one-rein emergency stop when the time comes.

There is another video and a complete discussion of this Task on our MagicMustangTamer.com website. We invite you to visit the site and sign up as a free subscriber if you are serious about learning least-coercive horse training methods.

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Task 37. Walk-Whoa-Back Riding from the Ground

Task 37. Walk-Whoa-Back Riding from the Ground

Riding from the ground is fun for the “rider” and the horse. Practice this simple exercise to get control and eliminate resistance. Riding from the ground will also tell you safely where the potential danger zones are while you are still safely on the ground. It won’t hurt to do a lot of this.

For more information on our least-coercive methods of training for mustangs and burros, please visit our website: www.MagicMustangTamer.com

Task 36: Walk with Trainer’s Arm-Over-Back

Task 36: Walk with Trainer’s Arm-Over-Back

We prepare for riding from the ground, by first helping the horse understand the human is only a little weird, but still fun to play with. Be aware that you are violating that good leading behavior you worked so hard to get in basic training. The key is making the hand on the back the signal that a different behavior will be rewarded.

For more information about how to train this behavior, check the blog on the Magic Mustang Tamer. As always, we appreciate your effort to help us help horses by liking and sharing our content.

Task 35: Back-up with Rein Cue

Task 35: Back-up with Rein Cue

We want the horse to understand the two cues that typically mean move in a rearwards direction: lead rope pressure and a verbal “back”. In this task, we focus on the lead rope or rein pressure Installing a low latency response to a rein pressure cue will make your horse much safer to ride.

For more information about teaching this behavior and more video, check the Task 35 blog on the Magic Mustang Tamer